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Best Of 2010


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Best Of :: People & Places

Best Place to LARP an Episode of “Scooby Doo” (1912)
Old Griffith Park Zoo
Photo: JuanCarlos Chan/Los Angeles Dept of Recreation and Parks

Tucked away in a secluded canyon in the park beckons the old Griffith Park Zoo, a quiet haven of peace and high-quality strangeness. Built in 1912, the old zoo is several acres of grimy, dark cages set amid boulder-lined grottoes once home to lions, tigers, bears, etc. (The animal collection eventually outgrew the site and the zoo moved to its current spot in the northeast corner of the park.) There’s a perversely enjoyable sense of obsolescence and abandonment here that blends well with one’s very own, and as the only sounds are birdsong and the hushed trickling of a small stream nearby, there’s something calmly resonant about it all, a kind of frisson — albeit a spooky one. Stroll about and think your thoughts (during the week is best), curl up with a book on the grass, do your yoga bits, meditate, sleep ... In Griffith Park, off Griffith Park Drive just north of the merry-go-round and west of the Wilson golf course. —John Payne

4730 Crystal Springs Dr., Los Angeles, 90027
Best Spot for Graffiti Spotting

L.A. is a city with a skeleton of concrete. For graffiti artists, this corpse can be a canvas. In some urban corners, often left untouched (and unbuffed) by the powers that be, graffiti murals spring up like trees planted by invisible arborists. But these areas, like old-growth forests, are becoming rare. The mouth of the Belmont Tunnel — where the city’s first subway ran — was once the premier guerrilla gallery for urban artists. Today, lofts stand in its place, but one classic, old-school graffiti spot remains: the bridge at the confluence of the Arroyo Seco and the Los Angeles River. Murals, scrawled in the imaginative typography of the street, span the gray walls, sometimes extending down into the green waters of the basin. And on the undersides of the bridges, markings of the original graffiti artists, early-20th-century hobos, are written in coal swiped from the engine rooms of freight trains. Past meets present, forever etched on the urban walls. Under the Arroyo Seco Parkway, in the L.A. River. —Drew Tewksbury

Best F-U NEW YORK Museum
Hammer Museum

Billionaires covet eponymous museums like starlets pursue bigger breasts, then stock them with established names like rappers flashing their bling. Yet time often transcends such vanities, and a good museum becomes a presenter of breakthrough or unsung work. So beckons the Hammer Museum. Start with architecture that interacts with the street, making its shows Wilshire Boulevard–visible. Add programming that thinks bigger — say, discourses on global politics or surfboard design or a talk with artist-provocateur Paul McCarthy — none of which gets it too far from its primary mission. As well as internationally acclaimed artists, the Hammer consistently reveals new L.A. talent and respects established ones. Mark Bradford showed here five years before he appeared in the Whitney Biennial. Elliot Hundley’s first museum show was here. Meanwhile, retrospectives for the illustrious Richard Hawkins and Llyn Foulkes are in the works, as is an L.A. biennial. And all of it is an easy walk to three bus lines. That’s cosmopolitan. 10899 Wilshire Blvd., Wstwd. (310) 443-7000, —Tibby Rothman

10899 Wilshire Blvd., Westwood, 90024
Best Japanese Garden
Suiho En

Suiho En, or the Garden of Water and Fragrance, is a stunning, traditional Japanese garden at the center of the San Fernando Valley’s vast watershed that reminds us of the beauty of water and nature, in poetic contrast to the adjacent reclamation plant that removes tons of sludge from our water system daily. Visitors are urged to walk, sit, “emulate Lord Buddha ... in silent contemplation of the human condition” (and to also view the wastewater filtering process up close). The cost of pursuing spiritual enlightenment at the garden is $3; call in advance for docent-led tours. 6100 Woodley Ave., Van Nuys. (818) 756-8166, —Suzy Beal

6100 Woodley Ave., Van Nuys, 91406
Best Inhospitable Hospital (1904)
Linda Vista Community Hospital

Abandoned places have their own energy — or seem to, at least, if you watch any basic-cable pseudoscience-channel filler programs about hauntings or the paranormal. The abandoned Linda Vista Community Hospital in Boyle Heights is used these days as a shooting location for everything from episodes of ER to music videos to assorted horror movies dripping with that dull post-Saw decay for effect. You can wander through for a fee. Founded in 1904 as the Santa Fe Railroad Hospital, it served railway employees who got sick of working on the railroad all the livelong day. Closed in 1991, it’s been the focus of intrepid urban explorers who are either too principled or too cheap to pay the admission fee charged by the on-site guard. So why would ghosts choose to haunt places with very little life left in them? Psychoacoustic feedback loops, unexplained penance and just plain spectral loneliness have all been offered as guesses at ghostly motivation, but the faithful and the skeptical can agree that the building currently crumbling away slowly in East Los Angeles resembles a ghost because it’s just sad. 610 S. St. Louis St., Boyle Heights. (323) 526-4222. —David Cotner

610 S. St. Louis St., Los Angeles, 90023
Best Host to Toast a Ghost

It doesn’t take much more than decent eyesight to see a celebrity in L.A. But a ghost? That might take some doing. Fortunately, Richard Carradine and G.H.O.U.L.A. are here to help. Ghost Hunters of Urban Los Angeles hosts “Spirits With Spirits” gatherings, on the 13th of each month, in a haunted locale. Their slogan: “Let’s put the ‘Boo!’ back into ‘booze.’” G.H.O.U.L.A. gatherings bring together kindred spirits to swap ghost stories and hunt for specters in a congenial atmosphere. In August, on Friday the 13th, the group visited Santa Anita Race Track’s Derby Restaurant, said to be haunted by Seabiscuit’s jockey, George Woolf. In September they moved on to Echo Park’s 1642, in a Deco building that opened in 1914 and has been a neighborhood bar since at least the 1940s; its ghost reportedly is a happy, tippling type of spirit, prone to bumping bartenders and patrons alike. Skeptics welcome. —Lisa Horowitz


Best Place to LARP an Episode of “Scooby Doo” (1912): Old Griffith Park Zoo


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