Melissa Anderson

 

Melissa Anderson is the senior film critic at the Village Voice, for which she first began writing in 2000. Her work also appears in the publications of the Voice’s film partner, Voice Media Group: LA Weekly, Denver Westword, Phoenix New Times, Miami New Times, Broward-Palm Beach New Times, Houston Press, Dallas Observer and OC Weekly.

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  • It took Julie Dash more than a decade to make her oneiric and lush mythopoetic masterwork, Daughters of the Dust, which, after premiering at Sundance in 1991, became the first feature directed by an African-American woman to receive a wide...

  • Of the dozens of (mostly) short- and medium-length works that Chicago-based artist and filmmaker Deborah Stratman has made, I had previously seen only one, O'er the Land (2009), a taut, near-hour-long essay filled with firepower...

  • Bad things happen in threes in Almost Christmas, David E. Talbert’s routine tears-and-gags holiday homily. It is the number of times that poor Danny Glover, headlining as Walter Meyers, a recently widowed Alabama paterfamilias preparing...

  • The almost-70 Iggy Pop, the star attraction of Jim Jarmusch's worshipful documentary about The Stooges, proves just as charismatic as a raconteur seated in some ornately decorated living room as he did as a wiry, wired, blood-smeared djinn...

  • A question is posed to the main character of Barry Jenkins' wondrous, superbly acted new film, Moonlight: "Who is you, man?" The beauty of Jenkins' second feature radiates from the way that query is explored. It is asked by a black man of...

  • 2 months ago | Film and TV

    A question is posed to the main character of Barry Jenkins’ wondrous, superbly acted new film, Moonlight: “Who is you, man?” The beauty of Jenkins’ second feature, which follows his San Francisco–set black-boho romance Medicine for Melancholy (200...

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