Music Picks: Liz Phair, DeVotchKa, Peter Murphy, Fergus & Geronimo | Music | Los Angeles | Los Angeles News and Events | LA Weekly
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Music Picks: Liz Phair, DeVotchKa, Peter Murphy, Fergus & Geronimo 

Also Whitechapel, Motorhead, Juanes and others

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Whitechapel

@ HOUSE OF BLUES

In a very graphic case of "going to 11," Tennessee's Whitechapel crafts its malevolent deathcore with three guitarists. This allows for down-tuned doom, finger-widdling flurries and punctuating false harmonic squeals to simultaneously provide context for Phil Bozeman's disturbingly possessed post-Pantera vocals and a rhythm section that attacks with a cornered, Gadhafi-esque cruelty. Last year's A New Era of Corruption is both a triumph of actual songs over pure riffs and, in the wake of the tragic death of Bozeman's mother, a monument to pessimism ("The Darkest Day of Man" and "Single File to Dehumanization"). Technically excellent yet utterly heartfelt, Whitechapel is a soundtrack for cynical teens moving out of their parents' shadow and into the world — and that's no small achievement. —Paul Rogers

click to enlarge Motorhead: See Friday.
  • Motorhead: See Friday.

Location Info

Fergus & Geronimo

@ THE TROUBADOUR

Last January we tipped the secret legion of clever weirdos (Matt Groening and Gary Panter, we're looking at you) to the release of a little gem called unlearn, by Texas duo Fergus & Geronimo. It's kinda uncanny how "Wanna Know What I Would Do If I Was You" sounds like a 1968 vintage Mothers studio outtake, and the Zappatista effect is enhanced by note-perfect askew pseudo-oldies "Powerful Lovin' " and the title track. Jason Kelly and Andrew Savage hide behind the Fergus and Geronimo masks, and they are also (surprise, surprise) big Sparks fans. "We both have a natural inclination for being odd," says Savage/Fergus. We'd like to issue a full endorsement of their oddity. —Gustavo Turner

Also playing Saturday:

REVOLVER at the Satellite; UNWRITTEN LAW, THE PRICKS at the Roxy; SXSW KICK-OFF PARTY WITH MIAMI HORROR, CHAPEL CLUB, SUPERHUMANOIDS at the Echoplex; 2-HEADED BEAST FEST at CalArts; GONZALES at Mondrian/Skybar.

 

sun 3/13

J*DaVeY, Blu

@ Key Club

Miss Jack Davey, the sexy-tough lead singer, and Brook D'Leau, the beatsmith who backs her as she climbs the microphone stand, are J*DaVeY, a Los Angeles duo you'd swear was masterminded by Prince. With D'Leau's viscous beats throbbing underneath Miss Jack Davey's panting vocals, the music's as seductive as their live show. Blu, L.A.'s most enigmatic, artistic rapper, joins them tonight. Although the blogosphere waits breathlessly for another album — hell, another anything — from him, he lives in a cosmos with a different address from the rest of us. But at a Boombox appearance last fall, a female DJ succeeded in drawing him back down to Earth. Every artist needs a muse, and Miss Jack Davey seems ripe for Blu's picking. Or vice versa. —Rebecca Haithcoat

Love Revisited

@ ALEX'S BAR

Love Revisited is more than just a tribute to the late, great Arthur Lee, as the project features Love's original lead guitarist, Johnny Echols, and one of Lee's longtime backup bands, Baby Lemonade. While Love Revisited essays many Love classics, including "Alone Again Or" and "7 & 7 Is," what makes the group so fascinating is how they remake relative obscurities like "Can't Explain" and Echols' unreleased late-'60s rarity "America." Even better, it's nothing but a pure joy to hear Echols' bubbling eruption of notes on the hard-rock coda to the multipart psychedelic epic "Your Mind and We Belong Together." Although neither Echols nor Baby Lemonade's Mike Randle can sing with the same force, wit and sheer personality as the mercurial Lee, their versions will make you fall in Love again. —Falling James

Juanes

@ STAPLES CENTER

In contrast with his fellow Colombian superstar Shakira (whose Sale el Sol kept his P.A.R.C.E. out of the top spot on Billboard's Latin Albums chart last December), Juanes has yet to make a move into English-language pop. But that's hardly prevented him from rousing arena audiences throughout the United States: An open-eared rocker addicted to big choruses, dude steps onstage and immediately starts transmitting the kind of charisma you need only eyes and ears to comprehend. Like all of Juanes' albums, P.A.R.C.E. contains no shortage of well-meaning issue songs about injustice and disaster. In "Segovia," for instance, he pays tribute to the victims of a politically motivated 1988 massacre in a Colombian town. As always, though, specificity somehow takes a backseat to universality. —Mikael Wood

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