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Weathermen’s Ticking Time Bomb 

The investigation into a cop killing in the ’70s leads to a Chicago law professor involved in the early stages of Barack Obama’s political career

Tuesday, Sep 15 2009
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Page 5 of 6

In December 1969, the group convened a “war council” in Flint, Mich., announcing its plans to attack institutions of the U.S. government and oppose “everything that’s good and decent in honky America,” according to an account of the meeting by former Weatherman Mark Rudd in his memoir, Underground. Rudd goes on to recount his own contribution to the proceedings: “It’s a wonderful feeling to hit a pig,” he told the group, using the slang term for a police officer. “It must be a really wonderful feeling to kill a pig or blow up a building.” Presiding over the meeting was Dohrn, the mercurial beauty FBI director J. Edgar Hoover once called “the most dangerous woman in America.”

The University of Chicago–educated Dohrn was a diva of the radical left, known for her shrill revolutionary creed. “We’re about being crazy motherfuckers,” she announced at the war council. Raising four fingers in what became known as the “fork salute,” she praised Charles Manson acolytes for stabbing pregnant actress Sharon Tate in the stomach with a fork when they killed her in 1969.

This darker phase of the Weathermen lasted through March 6, 1970, when three members of the group were killed in an accidental explosion while building a bomb at a Greenwich Village townhouse. That bomb, members of the group would later reveal, was intended to cause a massacre at an Army dance in Fort Dix, N.J.

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Following the townhouse explosion, the Weather leadership convened a summit at a beach house on California’s fog-hung Mendocino coast. At that conference, they decided to alter their bombing campaign, targeting only empty government facilities, according to Rudd’s memoir. Now in hiding or “underground” because of riot and conspiracy charges, the Weathermen went on to claim responsibility for setting small bombs at the Pentagon, the U.S. Capitol and the State Department, none of which resulted in the loss of human life.

Significantly, the attack on Park station falls within the narrow period between December 1969 and March 1970, when the Weather Underground was still loudly devoted to killing people.

“During that 10 weeks, they were intending, by their own statements — many statements — to commit acts of violence against persons,” said Todd Gitlin, a Columbia University journalism professor and former SDS president, who has written extensively on the history of the 1960s. Gitlin admitted that he had no direct knowledge of the Weathermen’s actions during the time in question, but said the bombing would have fit their M.O.: “It would have been consistent with their pronounced strategy during February 1970 if they had been involved in Park station.”

Resurfacing at the end of the decade, many of the Weathermen saw charges against them dropped or resolved with meager penalties because of the questionable FBI tactics used against them. Some went on to rehabilitate themselves through careers in academia. Dohrn is now a professor at Northwestern University Law School, and Ayers is an education professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Machtinger became a teacher in North Carolina. No former member or associate of the Weather Underground has ever publicly acknowledged a role in the Park station bombing.

Dohrn, Machtinger and Ayers did not respond to repeated requests for comment for this story. Brian Flanagan, a New York City resident and former Weather Underground member who has condemned the group’s tactics as misguided, denied that any Weathermen had carried out the bombing. “There’s nothing that I have for you on Park station, except that it was not the Weather,” he said. “I’m absolutely positive.” He declined to say whether he was in San Francisco when the attack took place: “That’s as far as I’m going to go.”

Rudd, who once held a leadership position in the group, said he didn’t think the Weathermen had a hand in the murder of McDonnell but acknowledged that he could not be sure, since he was not based in California at the time of the bombing.

“It’s my impression that Weather Underground was not involved in that at all,” he said in a telephone interview from New Mexico, where he now lives. “I was on the East Coast at the time, but I was still high enough in the organization. I never heard anything about it. Not only that, I was in a position to know.” He added, “Of course, that’s not any kind of exculpatory evidence.”

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