Loading...

Back on the Street: Susan Feniger's World Cuisine 

A virtual museum of street food, snacks and savories from every part of Asia

Wednesday, Apr 1 2009
Comments

When it opened in the 1980s, City Restaurant felt a lot like the future of Los Angeles cuisine: a restaurant that absorbed the influences of both the local Asian communities and the exotic places to which a reasonably hip Angeleno might be expected to travel, and re-envisioned the flavors through the prism of Susan Feniger and Mary Sue Milliken’s hard-won French technique. In her new Street, a hypercool restaurant in the space that once housed the coffeehouse Highland Grounds, Feniger, in her solo debut, revisits some of those transglobal ideas but with a direct, accessible twist. Cumin-scented millet puffs are brought to the table instead of bread and butter, and if that sounds like a good idea to you, Street — especially the comfortable patio abutting the fire pit — may become your new favorite restaurant.

Street is a virtual museum of world street food, snacks and savories from every part of Asia — Korean-style mung bean pancakes studded with bits of anise-braised pork belly; hollow, potato-stuffed Indian ping-pong balls called paani puri, moistened with a bit of spicy broth; a juniper-laced salad of roasted beets and crumbled walnuts; even a take on the classic Singaporean breakfast dish of toast with coconut-jam kaya and a runny egg. There are dense dal fritters, a delicious version of the do-it-yourself Thai bundles of roasted coconut, bird chiles, peanuts, tamarind jam and minced lime, among other things, sensibly wrapped in bits of collard instead of the traditional betel leaf. A “new Jerusalem bread salad” is a clever take on the Middle Eastern bread salad fattoush, spiked with feta and bits of Jerusalem artichoke (which of course has nothing to do with the region).

Half the menu is vegan-friendly, although you probably wouldn’t notice that fact unless it was important to you, and at least as much attention seems to have been paid to the roster of rare beers, and to the spiced lassis and various chilled coolers as to the short but appropriate wine list. This is a restaurant that understands Hollywood.

Location Info

Related Stories

  • Violence in Westwood 4

    A car-to-car beef preceded an officer-involved shooting today at a Westwood pro-Israel rally attended by Palestine sympathizers, authorities said. A "verbal and physical altercation" took place between the occupants of two vehicles at the end of the protest outside the Westwood Federal Building, an L.A. County Sheriff's Department official told...
  • Canteen Grill, a New Restaurant With a Great Bowl of Shakshuka 2

    Shakshuka is one of those dishes that, outside of Israel or North Africa, might best be enjoyed in the homes of Israeli friends. At least that's the way I've come to love the stew of tomatoes, red peppers and eggs, sopped up with crusty bread on leisurely Sunday mornings. There...
  • Discostan Features Music From "Beirut to Bangkok via Bombay"

    The strong smell of sandalwood-infused Indian Chandan Dhoop incense fills Arshia Haq's Echo Park apartment as she gets ready for the night. She has recently arrived back in the city after working on a music documentary in India and Pakistan, and the jet lag hasn't subsided - nor has that...
  • Where to Find Chopped Stars in L.A. 3

    For Food Network fans, Tuesday nights are devoted to Ted Allen, four competing chefs and the bizarre combinations of "mystery" ingredients found on Chopped (pretzel sticks, emu eggs and canned peaches, anyone?). Launched in 2009, the show pits four chefs against each other for a chance to win $10,000. Chefs...
  • Nick Ut: The Shot of a Lifetime 2

    It was a lucky shot, some say of Nick Ut's famous Vietnam War photo The Terror of War, or Napalm Girl, as it is more commonly known. Less lucky, of course, was the little girl in the photo, Kim Phuc. She was running down the street, naked, after a napalm...

Don’t miss Feniger’s parfait, a layered concoction of espresso gelatin, chocolate mousse and cream sweetened with special halvah imported all the way from Canter’s Delicatessen.

Susan Feniger’s Street: 742 N. Highland Ave., Hollywood; (323) 203-0500 or www.eatatstreet.com.

Related Content

Related Locations

Now Trending

Slideshows

  • Daw Yee: Mission of Burma
    L.A. has a very small pool of Burmese restaurants; among them, Daw Yee does not boast the most extensive menu. Nonetheless, Daw Yee, in Monterey Park, is fascinating for one big reason — namely, that it gives L.A. something unusual: a Burmese restaurant that caters to younger diners.
  • The Year in L.A. Food (So Far)
    We've got so many restaurants, you could eat at a different joint every day of the year -- and probably the rest of your life -- and never go to the same place twice. It would be impossible (both physically and financially) to try them all, but luckily, you have us. Check out The Year in L.A. Food (So Far).
  • Ladies Gunboat Society at Flores
    At Ladies Gunboat Society, the new operation out of the restaurant that used to be Flores on Sawtelle Boulevard, the Hoppin’ John is served as an appetizer or a small plate rather than a side, and the price is the stuff of comedy.