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PROVE IT ON ME 

Thursday, Jan 10 2008
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"I don't like crackers with my soup... that kind of appetite will get me killed," insists lesbian blues singer Georgia Brooks (Sweet Baby J'ai) to Lindsay (Aynsley Bubbico), a wealthy white flapper whose sense of entitlement encompasses Georgia's bedroom. Lindsay argues that you can't see skin color in the dark. Georgia knows better. And so Dee Jae Cox's expository and repetitive play, set during the Harlem Renaissance, bats around the same old dichotomies of white-versus-black and rich-versus-poor as though mentioning hot buttons is the same thing as exploring them. Instead, we get shootings and pregnancies and voodoo spells, and that's enough for audiences who just want acknowledgment that interracial lesbian couples existed in 1929. But paradoxically, there's so little onstage chemistry, it's unlikely we'd root for them to work it out if they were the only lesbians in New York. J'ai does what she can to ground the play in her warm sensuality (singing throaty numbers by Michele Weiss), and there's some odd comic relief from her gin-swilling, chicken-bone tossing Creole aunt (Deborah Kellar). Cox's unending supply of sly double-entendres shows wit, but her resolution doesn't prove that love conquers all — it needs a well-timed stock-market crash. Kelly Ann Ford directs. Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.; Sundays, 3 p.m.; Sat., March 15, 3 p.m.; Sat., March 29, 3 p.m. Starts: Jan. 19. Continues through March 30, 2008

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Reach the writer at anicholson@laweekly.com

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