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Book Parking and Vice and Consent 

Our readers write

Wednesday, May 23 2007
Comments

Park Place

Thank you for the splendid issue on L.A.’s independent bookstores, and the lovely spotlight on Dutton’s Brentwood Books [“The Bookish Set,” May 18–24]. We are proud to be one of L.A.’s independent bookstores. I have one correction: We have over 250 parking spots behind the store. It may seem to be nitpicking, but in a city where we all drive (well, almost all of us), parking is on everyone’s mind. At Dutton’s, parking is free and plentiful.

Lise FriedmanEvents Coordinator, Dutton’s Brentwood BooksVice and Consent

I enjoyed your issue of the L.A. Weekly centered on interesting people [May 11–17] but found myself deeply shocked by the article on porn director Paul Thomas. Staff writer Steven Mikulan spins an interesting set of contrasts together to capture some of the eclectic genius of Porn Valley legend P.T. but uses reckless and dangerous language when he suggests that “the gonzo aesthetic . . . often show[s] women getting raped and tortured.” Having been involved in the adult entertainment industry for nearly a decade, in arguably every facet, including writing over 200 feature titles and directing over 30, I take umbrage at the suggestion that we subject women to such vile treatment. By definition, rape is typically associated with nonconsensual acts of penetration via threat of and/or use of force, while torture most commonly refers to grievous bodily harm as well as mental and/or physical anguish. Never in all the time that I have been involved in the adult-entertainment industry, despite working for nearly every noteworthy company, have I been witness to either of these circumstances. Neither have I heard of such instances occurring at other companies. This type of unsubstantiated and inflammatory rhetoric only further reinforces negative stereotypes regarding the actions of consenting adults engaged in prurient activities for fun and for profit, playing into the hands of those who would ultimately restrict our freedoms of expression.DCypherClub Jenna contract director

Steven Mikulan responds: To clarify, I was referring to a niche of a subgenre, and not to the mainstream adult film industry.

You Rawk!

A note to music editor Kate Sullivan: As a longtime singer-songwriter (don’t worry, I’m not some suck-up angling at you), I just want to say that you give me hope. For music, actually. I can’t recall when I’ve read someone as open minded or as honest and ­unaffected as you are in your response to music. A great song is a great song, no matter who did it or what it is. You’re the only one I hear owning that.

Ben HunterLos AngelesListen to the Biologists

What was a fine writer like Judith Lewis thinking when she attempted to compare the decision-making processes and insights about wetlands habitat restoration of Mira Tweti with Roy van de Hoek [“The Bird Lady vs. The Tree Outlaw,” March 30–April 5 ]? In a city with so many immediate and deeply consequential environmental problems, Lewis’ essay represents a lost opportunity for your readers. We need to hear from deeply knowledgeable biologists like van de Hoek about how to assess and care for the minimal wetlands we have left.

Susan SuntreeSanta MonicaHate-Crime Reporting

Kate Coe’s article on the Long Beach Halloween attack [“Long Beach Hate Crime,” Jan. 5–11] was the best editorial I have read on the subject. She added a lot of new information and insights rather than just reading off the AP wire. The story was of national caliber and accurate (I work in Long Beach; that’s how the locals are).

Brian StewartLos AngelesRewarding Work

The Missouri Lifestyle Jour­nal­ism Awards were announced this week, bringing good news to the L.A. Weekly’s Judith Lewis. Two of her pieces were among three finalists in the Consumer Affairs category: “Green to the Core” (Nov. 11–17, 2005) and “Who’s Resurrecting the Electric Car?” (July 14–20, 2006).

CorrectionsIn the Weekly’s People issue, the profile of Bob Say [“The Pursuit of Vinyl Happiness,” May 11–18] incorrectly states that Say has Dumpster-dived for records. The incident in the article involved another dealer.

Due to an editing error, the wrong name was given for actor Lou Becker in the review of the play Fowl [Stage section, May 4–10 issue].

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