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Jest Fest 

Dave Eggers on David Foster Wallace�s Infinite Jest

On the occasion of its tenth anniversary, Little Brown is publishing a new $10 edition of Infinite Jest with a new foreward by Dave Eggers, which follows here. Skylight Books hosts a re-issue party on Sunday, November 19, at 5pm; 1919 N. Vermont Avenue in Los Feliz, (323) 660-1175 or www.skylightbooks.com

In recent years, there have been a few literary dustups � how insane is it that such a thing exists in a world at war? � about readability in contemporary fiction. In essence, there are some people who feel that fiction should be easy to read, that it�s a popular medium that should communicate on a somewhat conversational wavelength. On the other hand, there are those who feel that fiction can be challenging, generally and thematically, and even on a sentence-by-sentence basis � that it�s okay if a person needs to work a bit while reading, for the rewards can be that much greater when one�s mind has been exercised and thus (presumably) expanded.

Much in the way that would-be civilized debates are polarized by extreme thinkers on either side, this debate has been made to seem like an either/or proposition, that the world has room for only one kind of fiction, and that the other kind should be banned and its proponents hunted down and, why not, dismembered.

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But while the polarizers have been going at it, there has existed a silent legion of readers, perhaps the majority of readers of literary fiction, who don�t mind a little of both. They believe, though not too vocally, that so-called difficult books can exist next to, can even rub bindings suggestively with, more welcoming fiction. These readers might actually read both kinds of fiction themselves, sometimes in the same week. There might even be � though it�s impossible to prove � readers who find it possible enjoy Thomas Pynchon one day, and Elmore Leonard the next. Or even: readers who can have fun with Jonathan Franzen in the morning while wrestling with William Gaddis at night.

David Foster Wallace has long straddled the worlds of difficult and not-as-difficult, with most readers agreeing that his essays are easier to read than his fiction, and his journalism most accessible of all. But while much of his work is challenging, his tone, in whatever form he�s exploring, is rigorously unpretentious. A Wallace reader gets the impression of being in a room with a very talkative and brilliant uncle or cousin, who, just when he�s about to push it too far, to try our patience with too much detail, has the good sense to throw in a good low-brow joke. Wallace, like many other writers who could be otherwise considered too smart for their own good�Bellow comes to mind�is, like Bellow, always aware of the reader, of the idea that books are essentially meant to entertain, and so almost unerringly balances his prose to suit. This had been Wallace�s hallmark for years before this book, of course. He was already known as a very smart and challenging and funny and preternaturally gifted writer when Infinite Jest was released in 1996, and thereafter his reputation included all the adjectives mentioned just now, and also this one: Holy shit.

No, that isn�t an adjective in the strictest sense. But you get the idea. The book is 1,067 pages long and there is not one lazy sentence. The book is drum-tight and relentlessly smart and, though it does not wear its heart on its sleeve, it�s deeply felt and incredibly moving. That it was written in three years by a writer under 35 is very painful to think about. So let�s not think about that. The point is that it�s for all these reasons�acclaimed, daunting, not-lazy, drum-tight, very funny (we didn�t mention that yet but yes) � that you picked up this book. Now the question is this: Will you actually read it?

In commissioning this foreward, the publisher wanted a very brief and breezy essay that might convince a new reader of Infinite Jest that the book is approachable, effortless even � a barrel of monkeys� worth of fun to read. Well. It�s easy to agree with the former, more difficult to advocate the latter. The book is approachable, yes, because it doesn�t include complex scientific or historical content, nor does it require any particular expertise or erudition. As verbose as it is, and as long as it is, it never wants to punish you for some knowledge you lack, nor does it want to send you to the dictionary every few pages. And yet, while it uses a familiar enough vocabulary, make no mistake that Infinite Jest is something other. That is, it bears little resemblance to anything before it, and comparisons to anything since are desperate and hollow. It appeared in 1996, sui generis, very different than virtually anything before it. It defied categorization, and thwarted efforts to take it apart and explain it.

  • Dave Eggers on David Foster Wallace�s Infinite Jest

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