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The Back Story 

Hello, Old Europe!

Thursday, May 29 2003
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“This administration in Washington is honestly asking other human beings to believe that American security is so precious, that it can have in its possession whatever weapons of mass destruction it might want, but others can’t. You know, I heard that argument for years. I’ve worked on this subject for over a quarter of a century . . . I’ve written a book about it. And the Indians were quite compelling, saying, ‘We can’t accept that somehow American security is more important than ours. We’ve got China on our border with nuclear weapons, they’ve attacked us several times. We can’t accept the basic inequity that is involved in that position.’ The United States is about to bring that inequity to a height and it will have nothing to say, nothing that it can credibly say to any other country — ‘You may not have these weapons’ — or indeed to a terrorist group, if it itself walks away from what it has solemnly promised under international law. I welcome your calling attention to this. People must debate this. This is a very serious move.”

All your bombs are belong to us: Former UNSCOM inspector Richard Butler on the U.S. government’s plans to incorporate “mini-nukes” in its arsenal.

“Reporters Without Borders today protested against the detention of six French journalists on arrival a week ago at Los Angeles international airport to cover a video games trade show [E3] and their forcible repatriation after being held at the airport for more than 24 hours . . . They were subjected to interrogation sessions and six body searches. They were handcuffed while being moved from one place to another, and they were fingerprinted. One official told [one of the journalists that] he would not be able to return to the United States again.”

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“Europe’s elite . . . are suspicious that the U.S. does not need or even want a stable, legitimate central government in Iraq. When that happens, there will be no reason for the U.S. to remain in the country. Europe’s elite see the U.S. establishing ‘facts on the ground’: establishing a long-term military presence and getting the oil flowing again under American control. This could go on for years, as long as the Americans can guarantee enough essential services to prevent the Iraqi people from engaging in a war of national liberation.”

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Reach the writer at judith.lewis@laweekly.com

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