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Ask Mr. Gold 

Thursday, Feb 20 2003
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Q: I will be arriving back home in L.A. after a yearlong stint in Japan. I wonder what my life will be like after having had the pleasure of dining at authentic Japanese revolving sushi restaurants. Do these exist in L.A. or will I have to suffer the loss of sashimi and tekka makki rolls on conveyer belts?

—Tania Davila

A: Fear not. I haven’t yet come across a sushi restaurant featuring robots, or model trains, or voice-activated clowns, but the venerable conveyer belt at Frying Fish will zip you every sort of soft-shell-crab sushi and spicy tuna roll you could wish for — as well as a few you probably haven’t anticipated. Unless, of course, your stay in Tokyo has adequately prepared you for the undulating deep-fried magnificence that is Frying Fish’s famous Las Vegas Roll. Frying Fish, 120 Japanese Village Plaza, Little Tokyo, (213) 680-0567.

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